Mounting ENGNAS Network Drives

Use VPN Mounting from Off Campus

To mount the network shares from off campus, you'll have to connect to the VPN before the above instructions will work. The instructions for doing so on a number of different operating systems are maintained by IS&T and can be found here.

Windows

Accounts Authenticated with Kerberos (System Joined to AD)

To map the network drive in Windows:

  1. Right-click on "My Computer" on the desktop or on the start menu
  2. Click "Map Network Drive..."
  3. Select a suitable drive letter.
  4. Type in path to network drive (see table below)
  5. Check "Reconnect on Login" if desired.

Drive Letter

Address

V

\\ad\eng\courses

W

\\ad\eng\administration OR \\ad\pho\administration

U

\\ad\eng\research OR \\ad\pho\research

X

\\ad\eng\users\<firstLetterofUsername>\<secondLetterofUsername>\<username> (for example: user jsmith would be \\ad\eng\users\j\s\jsmith)

N

\\ad\eng\support

Locally Authenticated Account (*NOT* Joined to AD)

To map the network drive in Windows:

  1. Right-click on "My Computer" on the desktop or on the start menu
  2. Click "Map Network Drive..."
  3. Select a suitable drive letter.
  4. Type in path to network drive (see table below)
  5. Check "Reconnect on Login" if desired.
  6. Check "Connect using a different user name" or "Connect using different credentials"
  7. Make sure when typing your username that you prefix your username with "ad\", ie.,

ad\jsmith   

Drive Letter

Address

V

\\engnas.ad.bu.edu\Courses

W

\\engnas.ad.bu.edu\Administration\eng_administration

U

\\engnas.ad.bu.edu\Research

X

\\engnas.ad.bu.edu\Users\<firstLetterofUsername>\<secondLetterofUsername>\<username> (for example: user jsmith would be \\engnas.ad.bu.edu\Users\j\s\jsmith)

N

\\engnas.ad.bu.edu\Support


MaxOS X

To map a network drive in OS X:

  1. In the Finder, open the the "Connect to Server" dialog by clicking Go->Connect to Server (or by using the hotkey Apple+K)

  2. Type in path to network drive (see table below)
  3. Click on the "+" to save the entry
  4. Click connect
  5. In the new dialog, make sure the "Workgroup|Domain" field reads "AD"
  6. Make sure the "Name" field contains "AD" for the domain and your kerberos username (i.e. "AD\<username>")

  7. Type in your kerberos password and click OK

Mac OSX 10.6 and newer

Drive Letter

Address

V

smb://engnas.bu.edu/Courses

W

smb://engnas.bu.edu/Administration/eng_administration

U

smb://engnas.bu.edu/Research

X

smb://engnas.bu.edu/Users/<firstLetterofUsername>/<secondLetterofUsername>/<username> (for example: user jsmith would be smb://engnas.bu.edu/Users/j/s/jsmith)

N

smb://engnas.bu.edu/Support

You will be asked to fill in your authentication information every time you connect to a server.

If you would like to add a shortcut to the network drive to your desktop:

  1. After you have mounted the network drive, open the share in finder.
  2. Find the subfolder you wish to have an alias.
  3. Hold option command and drag that folder to your desktop to create an alias.

If you are mounting the W or V drives (which contain separate container volumes which hold more specific volumes like research shares or department administration shares), you will need to modify the path to the alias, so that it reconnects correctly after a reboot.

  1. With the share still mounted, right click the alias and select Get Info.
  2. Under General click Select New Original
  3. In the window that opens select engnas.bu.edu under Shared
  4. Select the next level (Administration, Research, Users).
  5. Select the next level (eng_administration, your particular research share or the first letter of your username).
  6. Continue to select folders until the full path to the folder you wish to alias is mapped out, and hit open.
  7. Your alias will now be able handle a reboot.


Linux

AD-joined BU Linux 6

Contact enghelp@bu.edu to have your BU Linux 6 machine joined to the Active Directory, as described at http://collaborate.bu.edu/engit/BULinux/Upgrade5to6. Once your machine is joined to AD, you should add the mountpoints that you use frequently to your /etc/fstab file so that they will mount automatically on bootup. At the very least, ENG users should run: mkdir -p /ad/eng/users; mkdir /ad/eng/support; mkdir /ad/eng/research

and then add the following lines to your /etc/fstab exactly as shown. Note that these lines may have line-wrapped on your screen to two lines, but make sure that each is truly only one line when you enter it into your fstab:

engnas.bu.edu:/Courses/       /ad/eng/courses   nfs     vers=3,rw,tcp,soft,sec=krb5,nolock,intr,noacl,rsize=8192,wsize=8192,noatime   0 0 

engnas.bu.edu:/Administration/eng_administration       /ad/eng/administration   nfs     vers=3,rw,tcp,soft,sec=krb5,nolock,intr,noacl,rsize=8192,wsize=8192,noatime   0 0 

engnas.bu.edu:/Research/       /ad/eng/research   nfs     vers=3,rw,tcp,soft,sec=krb5,nolock,intr,noacl,rsize=8192,wsize=8192,noatime   0 0 

engnas.bu.edu:/Users/<firstLetterofUsername>/secondLetterofUsername>/<username>       /ad/eng/users nfs     vers=3,rw,tcp,soft,sec=krb5,nolock,intr,noacl,rsize=8192,wsize=8192,noatime   0 0 

BU Linux 5 and other non-AD Linux (ie. Ubuntu)

SSHFS

If you are not running BU Linux 6 that has been joined to AD you will need to use SSHFS. You will need to enable fuse in the Kernel (under Filesystems) and modprobe fuse if you compiled it as a module. The sshfs package is usually called fuse-sshfs. It is not a part of the BU Linux repositories, but was a part of Gentoo, for example. Your experience may vary. An RPM can be found here:

http://dag.wieers.com/rpm/packages/fuse-sshfs/

With sshfs installed, mount the share as follows:

sshfs -o workaround=rename user@engineering-grid.bu.edu:/ad/eng/<share> /<local mount point>   

For example:

$ mkdir ~/U $ sshfs -o workaround=rename myusername@engineering-grid.bu.edu:/ad/eng/research/eng_research_myshare ~/U myusername@engineering-grid's password: 

the "workaround=rename" option is recommended to ensure that certain programs, such as Subversion, work properly.

If you get an error about not having permissions to run fusermount, you need to make it executable:

sudo chmod +x /bin/fusermount   

(See http://linux.dsplabs.com.au/forums/ubuntu-linux-help/ubuntu-fuse-failed-to-exec-fusermount-permission-denied-t70.html for more details.)

Quota Limits on Network Drives

If you find that ENG GRID jobs that write large amounts of data, such as Cadence simulations, are failing inexplicably, check if you're out of space in your home directory. Note that the X: (/ad/eng/uses/u/s/username) drive has a hard quota limit of 10GB per user and cannot be updated. If your lab has a research share (/ad/eng/research), it is recommended that you put large amounts of data here instead. Note that large amounts of data are often included beneath dotfile directories (those that start with a '.') which may just be full of unneeded temporary data. On Linux systems with the AD drives mounted, such as on lab machines or on enggrid, you can check your quota usage by running "quota -s". On Windows, you should right-click on the top-level of your home directory and choose "properties", and your drive usage will be calculated (this may take a while as it counts up).

Eng-IT: MountingENGNAS (last edited 2017-05-11 20:39:00 by jkgoebel)